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October 26, 2001
In recent years, greater demand has developed in the European and American pot plant market for solitary blooming products. There is also a clear social trend of people wanting to create their own floral arrangements. The anthurium pot plant meets...
October 26, 2001
Root rots – Pythium, Phytophthora and Rhizoctonia – are well-known enemies of flowering plants. Some root rots start with the fungal spore Cylindrocarpon, which thrives under wet, soggy or over-saturated conditions. Other fungi, including...
October 26, 2001
Caterpillars, the larval/immature stage of moths and butterflies, are generally not considered a major pest of greenhouse-grown crops. However, during summer through fall, moths can enter greenhouses through doors, vents and sidewalls (which are...
October 26, 2001
There is both good and bad news in spider mite management. If you are like me, you prefer to get the bad news out of the way first. If you would like to read the good news first, skip the first three paragraphs and read them later, when you can...
October 26, 2001
As consumers rediscover the ease and beauty of perennials and start to clamor for more varieties, growers must find ways to control the growth of this sometimes unruly group. Plant growth regulators (PGRs) can be an effective method of control, but...
October 09, 2001
Over the past few years, lantana has become one of the more popular spring crops, with several important uses for the grower and home gardener. Many new varieties with varying growth habit and flower color are now available to sustain its popularity...
October 09, 2001
The bad news is that the disease-spreading glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS) continues to grab headlines in California. The good news is that the pest is no longer hogging the spotlight. Through innovative research and generous funding, California...
October 09, 2001
  In 2000, I wrote a summary of then current information on one of the newest classes of fungicides for ornamentals –strobilurins. The original compound, strobilurin A, was isolated from a mushroom called Strobiluris tenacellus found growing on...
September 07, 2001
Western flower thrips are very difficult to control, particularly in greenhouse situations. Thrips are found in many crop environments, both indoor and outdoor, and can survive the harshest winters in the Northeast. The most common months that...
September 07, 2001
Powdery mildew diseases cause serious damage to many floral and ornamental crops in nurseries, greenhouses and landscapes both outdoors and indoors. The diseases are very similar, with symptoms initially appearing as small, white, powdery or dusty...
August 31, 2001
Virus-induced diseases of greenhouse-grown flowers have the potential to be some of the most economically devastating diseases associated with the production of these crops, and some plant viruses can be more of a problem than others. Common viruses...
August 31, 2001
Fungicide Resistance Fungicides should be used intelligently to prevent the loss of effectiveness by resistance development. Table 1 lists fungicides and their chemical classes that are most likely to develop pathogens with resistance. Do not make...
February 09, 2001
In elementary school, one teacher taught me that there are two unlimited, renewable natural re- sources — water and air. Even then that was an exaggeration, and it definitely is today. We are all concerned about water shortage and pollution of our...
January 30, 2001
After WWII and the scientific advances in plant physiology and life cycles that enabled the floriculture industry to grow seasonal crops year round, peonies gradually fell out of favor. The GIs coming back from the war moved off the farm, and their...
January 10, 2001
For the past three years, I have been asked to review new disease control products for the ornamental industry. In 1999, I tried to list newer products and their activities, including the broad range of those products now available. In 2000, a two-...